Worth Trying 2018

Welcome to our eighth annual Worth Trying Issue. Though we feature Worth Trying suggestions monthly, each January we devote much of the magazine to personal recommendations from staff, contributors and friends of Out & About. Below are suggestions on where and what to eat, drink, see and do.

Enjoy, and have a very happy New Year!

Picks of the Miscellaneous Variety

As the Crow Flies & Co

If the title isn’t cool enough, this home business, run by Mike and Wilder Scott-Straight, finds use for those discarded or tucked away bits of the past—specifically, vintage china. They fashion necklaces and earrings by taking bits of the china and soldering them with metal around the edges to provide a finished look. They also design vintage clothes for children and adults. The business is based out of West Philadelphia, but I discovered it closer to home at the Kennett Holiday Village Market at The Creamery in Kennett Square, where they were set up as a vendor. By the way: During the summer and fall when The Creamery is regularly open, the pop-up beer garden is also a definite must.

— Krista Connor, Senior Editor & Media Manager

Not Your Mother’s Thrift Shop

Clothes Mentor, on Rt. 202 in West Chester, buys and sells high-quality, gently used name-brand and designer women’s clothing, shoes and accessories that are like new—for less. The national franchise is where savvy women shoppers go to get their name brand on and sell some of their old but still fashionable clothing. Unlike consignment, you get paid on the spot for items accepted. Sizes 0-26 and maternity are welcome, and if you need assistance in finding the right styles for you, a free personal shopper program can help with that. For details, go to clothesmentor.com/store-locator.

— Adriana Camacho-Church, Contributing Writer

Word by Word, by Kory Stamper

Kory Stamper is my kind of woman. On the first day on the job, when she realized the extremely high level of word nerdiness that would be required of her as a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster, her joyous reaction was, “This is the shit!” In Word By Word, The Secret Life of Dictionaries, Stamper indulges her not-so-inner geek, delving into the meaning and origin of all sorts of words and phrases. She reveals, for instance, that the first use of “OMG” was by Winston Churchill in 1917. She also sadly confesses that M-W now accepts “irregardless” as legitimate (along with a depressingly large number of other abominations). For the most part, the book makes the process of publishing a dictionary intriguing and fascinating, but, be warned: You will need a fair amount of nerdiness yourself to plow through all 321 pages.

— Bob Yearick, Contributing Editor

Eastern Neck Wildlife Refuge, Rock Hall, Md.

This refuge is home to more than 250 species of birds, from migrating to wintering waterfowl. Many trails are available on 2,285 acres that offer unique and picturesque views of the Chesapeake Bay and Chester River. The hour-and-a-half ride from Wilmington is well worth it. And take your bike.

— John Murray, Contributing Writer

Nicole Kristiana Studios

Check out the delightful blend of whimsy and sophistication in the alphabetical and animal-inspired works of Bellefonte artist Nicole Kristiana Logan. Her paintings and prints are playful enough for kids to enjoy and possess intricate detail that adults can appreciate. Her exhibit at the Main Stage Gallery of The Grand continues into January. Or go online to nicolekristianastudio.com or visit the shops at the Delaware Contemporary and the Delaware Art Museum.

— Larry Nagengast, Contributing Writer

Work the Nightshift

No, I don’t mean burn the midnight oil at the local factory. I mean change your display settings on your iPhone. Once you schedule this to activate during certain times of day, you’ll immediately notice the warmer tones and less stimulating colors. I set mine from 7 p.m. through 7 a.m. It helps me keep the constant connection to a minimum.

— Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC

NextFab

After establishing two successful locations in Philly, NextFab came to Wilmington last year amid rave reviews. Think of it as a gym membership for your intellect and imagination. Whether you want to hand-craft a coffee table, build your own guitar, or learn how to assemble a small robot, NextFab is the place for your next project. They are currently offering tools, software and/or classes in the following subjects: 2-D printing and photography; 3-D printing and scanning; design software; electronics; jewelry; laser cutting and engraving; metalworking; textiles, and woodworking. nextfab.com.

— Jim Miller, Director of Publications

Delaware 87ers

Next fall, Wilmington will be the new home to this Philadelphia 76ers G League franchise and the team will be playing in a new, $26 million facility – the 76ers Fieldhouse. That’s a big deal. If you haven’t taken the time to check out the 87ers because you assume it’s a league for has-beens and never-will-bes, think again. I attended a recent game at the Bob Carpenter Center between the 87ers and Northern Arizona Suns and was blown away by the level of play. Both rosters were filled with recent All-Americans and players with some NBA experience. It’s quality basketball for as little as $10 a ticket. That won’t even get you parking at the Wells Fargo Center.

— Jerry duPhily, Publisher

Root: A Cultivated Collection

When it comes to plants, succulents are the trendy item. They don’t need much care (unlike me) but they offer a lot (also unlike me). If you’re looking for a local source of succulent arrangements to brighten your living space, look no further than Root. They’re the very picture of whimsy! Rootcultivated.com. @root_collection.

— David Hallberg, Special Projects

The Storm Before The Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic

The Romans did not give up their Republic in a day. In this New York Times best-seller, acclaimed history podcaster Mike Duncan describes how demagogues weakened the Roman Republic in the decades before Julius Caesar dealt it a deathblow. Duncan relates this under-told story in his characteristically engaging and thoughtful manner, and his readers need not look far to find parallels in modern day America.

— Dan Linehan, Contributing Writer

Kinetic Skateboarding

I used to skateboard a lot when I was younger, but as I grew up, I grew out of trying new tricks because falling hurts a lot more and now I just like to cruise around on a board. However, I still love skateboard culture and supporting local skate shops. Kinetic Skateboarding, on Rt. 202, is my go-to spot for skate shoes because they’re my preferred shoe and the most comfortable to me. But it’s also a great shop for kids to get into skateboarding because they have all the latest and best gear in stock. Want your kids to put the screens down and go outside? Take them to Kinetic, pick out a complete, customized skateboard and encourage them to use it.

— Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

Wolfenstein: The New Colossus

Most people remember Wolfenstein as an early success story for 3D gaming. That and mecha-Hitler. But in the time since, especially with the most recent game, the franchise has evolved into a heartfelt and emotional one, with strong, intelligent characters and an affecting story about a small group’s attempt to reclaim the soul of America. It’s still extremely violent, so that hasn’t changed, but I play video games for the stories, and The New Colossus tells the best I’ve ever played. It’s available for PS4, Xbox One, and PC.

— Dillon McLaughlin, Contributing Writer

Route 9 Library & Innovation Center

There are plenty of books, to be sure, but you won’t find them arrayed in row upon row of traditional shelving. Besides the study rooms and computer access that are staples at all New Castle County libraries, this facility features a maker lab, a STEM room, a sensory room, a bookatarium and a scriptorium. If you don’t know what they are … well, just visit and see for yourself.

— Larry Nagengast, Contributing Writer

Trap Pond State Park

The country’s northernmost bald cypress swamp is just a 90-minute drive from New Castle County. Be sure to reserve your campsite fast, because the best spots (especially the tent-only walk-in sites) go fast. If cabins or RV spots are more your speed, you’ve still got options at Trap Pond, which also has plenty of hiking, canoeing and bicycling options. 

— Dan Linehan, Contributing Writer

Delaware History Museum

The Delaware History Museum on Market Street, run by the Delaware Historical Society, underwent a lengthy renovation from 2014 to late 2016, but it’s open again and has plenty to offer families, couples, and inquisitive solo travelers. There are self-guided tours, professional programs, themed events, and community outreach, along with the best collection of Delaware themed gifts you’re likely to find. For more specific historical events, there’s a rotating exhibition on the second floor, currently devoted to the contributions of Delawareans to the War to End All Wars—WWI. The museum is open Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

— Dillon McLaughlin, Contributing Writer

Russell Peterson Wildlife Center

Wilmington’s Riverfront has become a well-known destination, but many have yet to discover this 212-acre wildlife center and its accompanying DuPont Environmental Education Center. The facility is free and open year-round and offers a beautiful 10-acre garden, a quarter-mile pond loop that weaves through the marsh, and an impressive four-story structure with panoramic views of the marsh and the city skyline. It’s an intriguing sanctuary that peacefully sits between hectic I-95 and the ever-expanding Wilmington Riverfront.

— Jerry duPhily, Publisher

Ninja Cooking System with Auto-iQ

Forget the old crock pot. Today there are a variety of all-in-one multi-cookers that can make your life so much easier. My favorite is the Ninja Cooking System with Auto-iQ, which has functions for slow-cooking, steaming, stove-top searing, sautéing and baking. I’ve used it for quick one-pot meals that include rice and shrimp. I’ve seared meat on the stovetop function, added veggies, and then hit the slow cook button. I’ve even used it instead of a frying pan to fry fish. Who needs a range or oven? Cleanup is a breeze. The MSRP is $179.99.

— Pam George, Contributing Writer

Hidrate Spark 2.0 Smart Water Bottle

I try my best to do the healthy thing this time of year, which often includes making sure I drink enough water. At the risk of people calling me lazy or ridiculous, I introduce you to my newest “health assistant,” and I’m quite hopeful about our relationship. Meet the Hidrate Spark 2.0, a “smart” water bottle that keeps track of how much you drink, glows to remind you when you need to up your water intake, and keeps you on par to meet your daily goal. It syncs to an app on your phone (iOS and Android) and can integrate with trackers like iWatch, FitBit and others.

— Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Contributing Writer

Picks of the Food Variety

De la Coeur Café et Boulangerie: Butter, Sugar, Flour

Wilmington has a new reason to celebrate. Popular Trolley Square French eatery De La Coeur Café et Pâtisserie has opened a second larger and more robust location in Talleyville Shopping Center on Route 202 and Silverside Road. Occupying the former Bon Appétit space, De la Coeur Café et Boulangerie offers a wide assortment of house-made goods, including French baguettes, croissants and other pastries, in addition to sandwiches, coffee and espresso drinks. I’m a sucker for their massive vanilla scones, buttery almond croissants or special hand pies (last time it was a blueberry and almond paste). You know where to find me on Saturday morning.

— Leeann Wallett, Contributing Writer

Iron Hill Brewery: Kennett Square Mushroom Soup

Though I’ve been ardently anti-mushroom all my life, at the ripe age of 27 I find that they have finally become palatable, a borderline menu staple even. Mushrooms as a garnish, mushrooms on the side, mushrooms with breakfast, lunch or dinner—sure. So, I recently gave Iron Hill’s Kennett Square Mushroom Soup a try, and it’s a kaleidoscope of taste you can’t go wrong with. Made of oven-dried shiitake and flavored with herbed truffle oil, this soup makes for a great winter appetizer.

— Krista Connor, Senior Editor & Media Manager

Kindred Cheese

Based in Wisconsin, the Meister family has been making cheese for more than a century. In the ‘90s, siblings Vicky and Scott Meister decided to branch out into the gourmet cheese market, hence the birth of the Kindred brand. They offer cheddar, Gouda and Jack varietals but it’s the Ghost Pepper, Spicy Sriracha and Sweet Fire Mango titles that stick out. Bonus points to Kindred for paying premium rates to dairy farmers who follow the company’s sustainable and ethically-minded “Cows First” protocols. kindredcreamery.com.

— Jim Miller, Director of Publications

George’s Restaurant, 703 Philadelphia Pike 

It doesn’t look like much from the outside—it’s located on a strip mall on Philadelphia Pike near Bellevue—but inside it serves made-from-scratch comfort food for breakfast, lunch and dinner. George’s—formerly Jimmy’s Restaurant —has a friendly, veteran staff and loyal customers. The food they serve—with emphasis on Greek cuisine—isn’t fancy, but it’s good and reasonably priced and comes in generous portions. The daily dinner specials, at $11.95, are always good and include chicken and dumplings (Monday) and stuffed pork chops (Thursday). Plus, George’s has an open seating area and isn’t as crowded or noisy as some other restaurant-diners in the area.

— Kevin Noonan, Contributing Writer

Lotus Biscoff Cookie Butter 

Like Frank’s RedHot sauce, I spread this sh*t on everything. In fact, Lotus Biscoff cookie butter may even replace your jar of Nutella (gasp!). First came the cookies, then the butter. Started in Belgium, Lotus Biscoff cookies made their way to the United States in the 1980s via in-flight snacks. These lightly sweet, crunchy cookie-biscuits are a delight, best served with a hot cup of coffee or cocoa. Recently, they became a spreadable treat, a special alternative to nut butters and chocolate spreads. The cookie butter is available in original or honey locally at Giant Food, ShopRite, Target and Walmart. Try it—you won’t be disappointed.

— Leeann Wallett, Contributing Writer

Cajun Kate’s on Philly Pike

I wrote about Cajun Kate’s a few years ago when it was holed away like some delicious speakeasy in the Booths Corner Farmers Market. Last year it opened its first full restaurant on Philadelphia Pike and now it’s a weekly visit for me. Chefs Don and Kate Applebaum have all their standards (the jambalaya, gumbo, and muffulettas are unmatched in Delaware or Philly), but don’t miss out on the specials: the frog legs and pork gumbo with collard greens are culinary perfection. Yes, there are tables now, but time is better spent at the bar, where the conversation is as interesting as the food is sublime.

— Joe del Tufo, Contributing Photographer

Crab Guacamole at Cocina Lolo

Who doesn’t love crabmeat and who doesn’t jones for a great guacamole? But imagine putting those twotaste sensations together. Cocina Lolo, Bryan Sikora’s Mexicali restaurant on King Street, does exactly that with its creamy but still chunky avocado appetizer generously augmented with sizable bits of succulent jumbo crab. But wait, that’s not it. Sikora tops the guac with queso fresco and mango, then serves the dish with hearty homemade tortilla chips. A masterful offering on a menu full of them at one of downtown’s dining gems. Cocina Lolo, 405 N. King St.

— Mark Fields, Contributing Writer

Taste Artisanal Market Honey

Ever since writing November’s “Foods that Fight Colds” article, I’ve been on a turmeric kick. Due to its supposed anti-inflammatory properties, this spicy rhizome is in everything I eat nowadays, including my new favorite spread, ginger turmeric honey from Taste Artisanal Market. This sweet and spicy concoction is made by local food purveyors Lisa Ferraro Klinge and her husband, Steve Klinge. Other products include additional flavored honeys like cinnamon and lemon walnut, and spreads like blue cheese walnut and marinated Asiago trio. Find a full list of the products here: tasteartisanalmarket.com/stockists.

— Leeann Wallett, Contributing Writer

Big Sky Bread Bakery and Café

On those winter days when I’m not in a mood to cook, but I’m craving a warm, hearty bowl of soup and fresh-baked, crusty bread to dip into it, I head to this Brandywine Hundred standout. The smell of wholesome baked breads and healthy, homemade soups invites me in. I usually get lentil soup, or the vegetarian chili with beans, which are my favorites from the wide selection. The homemade chips are always tempting, and the tasty sandwiches, made with your choice of bread, are equally irresistible.

— Adriana Camacho-Church, Contributing Writer

El Diablo Burritos

I wrote about El Diablo shortly after it opened seven years ago, but as long as it continues to serve yummy burritos—and actually finds ways to improve doing so—continual recommendations are well deserved. In addition to opening new stores in Newark and Pike Creek over the past three years, El Diablo has introduced more delicious sauces and healthier options like mahi-mahi, whole-wheat tortillas and brown rice. Similarly, as the menu states, the steak, short rib, braised pork and chicken come from animals that are 100 percent antibiotic-free as well as “respectfully raised and responsibly farmed.” eldiabloburritos.com.

— Jim Miller, Director of Publications

Bread & Buttercream, 170B Marsh Road

This bakery-eatery is the latest addition to what has become an impressive array of restaurants in the Graylyn Crest Shopping Center area. Bread & Buttercream is a typical bakery in that its main offerings are bread and cakes, but they take it up a notch with a home-made touch and enticing flavors. Bread items include cranberry-walnut-flax seed rolls ($1 each) and a diverse assortment of muffins, croissants and Danishes. Small cakes are $4.99 and include Caramel Mousse, Moroccan Lemon, Raspberry Crème and Kiwi Heaven. And this place isn’t just for breakfast or dessert—they plan to add a sandwich menu soon.

— Kevin Noonan, Contributing Writer

Picks of the Film & TV Variety

Movies On Tap

Seeing a classic movie that you haven’t seen on the big screen before is a whole new experience, especially with a beer in your hand. I had the pleasure of attending the December Movies On Tap, featuring Dogfish Head, showing the classic film National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation at Penn Cinema on the Riverfront. In partnership with Premier Wine & Spirits, Penn Cinema, and Out & About Magazine, this one-of-a-kind event was great. For $20, you get beer samples from the featured brewery, free popcorn, and admission to the theater. All proceeds go to a local charity of the brewery’s choice, which this time was the Urban Bike Project.

— Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel on Amazon Prime is my new favorite series. Maybe that’s because it was created by Amy Sherman-Palladino of The Gilmore Girls fame. The story, which takes place in the late 1950s, is about Miriam “Midge” Maisel, who seemingly has the perfect Upper West Side life until her husband leaves her for his secretary. With her world shattered, the picture-perfect Jewish housewife suddenly starts a career in standup comedy. It’s witty, quick and beautifully shot—and the period clothes are amazing.

— Pam George, Contributing Writer

Mindhunter on Netflix

Netflix continues its impressive run of excellent programming with the crime drama Mindhunter (based on the novel of the same name). Set in 1977, this David Fincher-directed series traces the origins of the FBI’s behavioral science department and the federal agents who coined the term “serial killer.” The show’s subject matter—including intense interviews with some of the 20th century’s most notorious murderers—is somewhat unsettling, and Fincher’s cold and clinical style enhances that atmosphere. Mindhunter isn’t just binge-worthy, it’s darned near binge-obligatory.

— Rob Kalesse, Contributing Writer

The Newspaperman

This HBO documentary about the fascinating and apparently irresistible Ben Bradlee, editor of The Washington Post during the Watergate era, is a must for every journalist or, indeed, anyone remotely interested in American history. Bradlee, who died in 2014 at the age of 93, narrates most of the doc, which traces his Bostonian beginnings to his Harvard years, his Navy service in World War II, his close (and inappropriate for a journalist) friendship with John F. Kennedy, his three marriages, and, of course, his ramrodding of the Post’s historic and heroic uncovering of the sordid details surrounding the Watergate Hotel break-in. A Renaissance man who could swear like a sailor (which he had been) while choosing the right fork, Bradlee was loved by women, idolized by men, and respected by all except Richard Nixon and his White House henchmen.

— Bob Yearick, Contributing Editor

Kevin (Probably) Saves the World

The latest show to put an everyman twist on divine intervention, Kevin follows Kevin Finn (Jason Ritter), a former Wall Street hot shot who’s returned to his Texas hometown after a suicide attempt. While there, an angel enlists him for a mission to find the next generation of righteous souls on earth by doing good deeds, each of which gets him closer to his final goal, while navigating the realities of his return to small-town life. Tuesdays at 10 p.m. on ABC.

— Scott Pruden, Contributing Writer

The Deuce (HBO)

This HBO series, created by George Pelecanos and David Simon and starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, takes you on a gritty street-level tour of Manhattan in the early- to mid-‘70s, when prostitution, pimps and peep shows were staples on “the Deuce” (42nd between 7th and 8th Avenues). But this series isn’t just a sex romp with loads of gratuitous nudity—it details not only the ravages of the sex trade but also the rise of the porn industry as public morals, laws and technology begin to change. It’s an eye-opening, often rough trip through an equally rough era for the Big Apple, but you do get to see James Franco play opposite himself as his twin brother. Available On Demand.

— Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Contributing Writer

Three Lesser-Known TV Treats

I may be the movie critic for Out & About, but this cinephile appreciates an inventive, well-structured narrative no matter what the medium, and truth be told, some of the best storytelling these days is happening on TV and not at the local multiplex so much. Game of Thrones, Mr. Robot and now Stranger Things have gotten much of the public’s attention, but there are lesser-known gems worth exploring.

Catastrophe (Amazon) is a bawdy, candid sex comedy starring Sharon Horgan (who also created the series) and Rob Delaney. Their torrid fling turns into an ongoing relationship when she gets pregnant. Humans (AMC) plumbs a borderline between human and android similar to the glitzier Westworld; but being a British import, it is a more thoughtful contemplation of the meaning of humanness and the perils of cyber-technology. Casual (Hulu) is a modern character comedy about two stunted adults, brother and sister, and their extended dysfunctional family and friends…not much plot but fascinatingly flawed characters.

— Mark Fields, Contributing Writer

Marvel’s Runaways

What do you get when you combine the teen-tastic melodrama of Riverdale with the superhero-powered antics of Agents of Shield? Answer: Hulu’s original series Runaways, based on the comic of the same name. The show follows a group of Los Angeles friends who have fallen out with each other over the death of a peer and discover their parents’ annual “charity” event is actually a meeting of a secret sect called “The Pride.” Trying to foil the adults’ schemes, they discover previously unknown powers of their own. New episodes stream Tuesdays on Hulu.

— Scott Pruden, Contributing Writer

Picks of the Music Variety

Jupiter Records, 2200 Marsh Road

This is a browser’s paradise—rooms and rows and rows of records, including CDs and vinyl, of every music genre you’ve ever heard of and even a few you haven’t. Jupiter Records has filled a void in North Wilmington that was left when Jeremiah’s Record Exchange on Philadelphia Pike closed many years ago. Now there’s another place where you can just poke along and explore and get your hands on real vinyl. It’s also located in an old, historic building at the corner of Marsh and Grubb roads that gives the place an added ambiance. Just make sure you give yourself enough time, because this is not a place you want to rush through.

— Kevin Noonan, Contributing Writer

Vita and The Woolf – Tunnels

The debut full-length Tunnels from Philly’s Vita and the Woolf has largely flown under the radar this year, but it is not to be missed. Vocalist Jen Pague is a force of nature, and the music comes off something like Phantogram with Florence and the Machine on vocals. Brett, Sundrop, Qiet and the choir-enhanced re-envisioning of their earlier hit, “Mary,” are standouts. Catch them live before they are too big to see. Dates available at vitaandthewoolf.com.

— Joe del Tufo, Contributing Photographer

Grace Vonderkuhn

This leading area musician and her band will bring the glories of gritty garage rock to your ears. Catch them between Mid-Atlantic tours at Wilmington venues like 1984. Their new single, “Worry,” is a prelude to a full-length album slated for a Feb. 23 release through EggHunt Records. Have a listen at gracevonderkuhn.bandcamp.com.

— Krista Connor, Senior Editor & Media Manager

WMPH Radio – 91.7 FM

This student-driven radio station was started in 1969 by students at Mount Pleasant High School and was overhauled in 2011 with better equipment and a stronger commitment to serving the students of the Brandywine School District. And even though its 100-watt signal is hard to pick up outside the immediate area, it’s worth your time to find it. The station airs district sports events—with students doing the play-by-play and color commentary—and is also affiliated with Delaware Public Media, which gives it access to National Public Radio. But what makes WMPH special for listeners is its diverse play list. Naturally, it appeals to its student audience with newer music, but it also plays older stuff and doesn’t just regurgitate the played-to-death hits that you hear on most classic rock stations. I’ve heard it play Muddy Waters, the Grateful Dead, Glenn Miller, the Allman Brothers, Miles Davis and even Fairport Convention. Tune in and try it.

— Kevin Noonan, Contributing Writer

Picks of the Drink Variety

19 Crimes Wine

The “19 Crimes” wine is becoming popular, not only because of the quality of the wine, but also the experience. The brand has a historical aspect: The name refers to the British list of crimes that were punishable by transport to Australia. The labels on the wine bottles have the face of a real convict who was sentenced to Australia. Use the accompanying app, and it will animate the image to tell you the convict’s story. As a bonus, it’s also a very tasty wine. So stop in at your local liquor store and indulge in an evening of delicious wine and a historical tale.

— Zuny Jamatte, Catalyst Visuals Intern

Two Roads Espressway

Love a cup of coffee as much as a pint of beer? Why not have both in the same mug? Two Roads Espressway combines a delicious blend of Ethiopian and Sumatran coffee beans with the brand’s rich oatmeal stout, producing a silky, malty brew without any bitter aftertaste. How do they accomplish this? By using a German-built device called a “Brewnik,” which basically pressurizes the coffee and stout, steeping the two until cold-brewed coffee stout is ready for consumption. The Espressway is a new year-round addition to the Two Roads rotation, but the chilly weather makes for the perfect time to load up.

— Rob Kalesse, Contributing Writer

Bellefonte Brewing Company

A brewery you may not have heard much about yet is the Bellefonte Brewing Company. A nano brewery that focuses on making excellent beers with seasonal rotations, its calendar is densely packed with community events and educational offerings. If you consider yourself a beer sommelier, want to learn more about brewing your own stuff, or just want to get to know your neighbors better, a visit to the Bellefonte Brewing Company is well worth your time. The tap room is open Wednesdays through Sundays, though the hours fluctuate based on the day, so check times at bellefontebrewingco.com.

— Dillon McLaughlin, Contributing Writer

DIY Kombucha

My wife and I both realized we love drinking kombucha. It supports healthy gut bacteria and digestion and provides quick and easy energy, without the jitters that coffee can produce. Oh, and it tastes awesome. Most folks who like it find that it can be quite expensive (usually $4-$7 for a single serving). Au contraire, mon frère! I purchased a scoby (Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast) for only $9 at the local organic market and I’ve already filled a few dozen bottles of my own. It’s fairly simple and takes just about a week to produce a gallon that’s ready to enjoy. Go with your gut… give it a try.

— Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC

Home Craft Beer Tasting

There hasn’t been a better time to be a beer drinker than today. With breweries popping up left and right, finding great craft beer is easier than ever. I’ve been acquiring a variety of limited, hard-to-find beers and I have friends who do the same. So what do we do with all this beer? Share it, of course! But bars and restaurants usually frown upon this (unless it’s a BYOB) at their establishments, so we’ve been doing beer shares at home. Invite a few friends over, tell them to bring their selections, order some food and enjoy!

— Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

So, what do you think? Please comment below.