Worth Trying – Sept. 2016

Suggestions from our staff, contributors and readers

missp_NYTcover#1_300dpiMiss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

As an avid reader, I’m always looking for great books to read. When I picked up Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a fictional YA by Ransom Riggs, I found exactly that. This novel is part of a series about a boy named Jacob who learns that the world is not as simple as it seems. I highly recommend these books and am looking forward to the movie, which will be released on Sept. 30.

—Emma Driban, Intern

Del Pez Brunch

This relatively new option at Newark’s Main Street Mexican gastropub deserves some local acclaim. The Mayan Stacked Hashbrowns, particularly. A messy pyramid of potatoes, eggs and an addictive cheesy sauce, it’s the epitome of a weekend treat. More traditional options—French toast, classic eggs and bacon—seem equally wonderful. And with $4 mimosas, it simply can’t be beat.

—Krista Connor, Associate Editor

Maki sushi, two rolls isolated on whiteNasi Malay Thai Sushi in Bear

A friend of mine bartends at Nasi, and I have to thank him for turning me onto this spot. It’s ideal for sushi newcomers—the menu has some traditional options for any picky eaters. The staff was very friendly and accommodating. So stop in and ask for Jorge.

—Ryan Alexander, Contributing Designer

Remaking Murdertown

This podcast series about Wilmington’s crime and violence problem and how it’s connected to the vast economic poverty experienced by many of its residents has been getting a lot of buzz this summer. Released in May, with support from the Delaware Center for Justice, it features host Zac Phillips interviewing various people who know the causes, including Ricky Reyes, who grew up experiencing the city’s street life first hand. It’s a sobering reality that faces scores of cities in America in the age of vast income inequality, and a case study on how urban violence is the result of poverty. I think it’s something quite a few people need to hear. Give it a listen at remaking.murdertown.us.

—Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

So, what do you think? Please comment below.